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Pain in the neck, back, shoulders...who pays the price?

Posted by Belinda Cabria on

Introducing the revolutionary functional design in active seating, the ErgoFlip, created as the solution to sitting healthy at your desk to help sedentary workers achieve instantaneous mobility to prevent muscular disorders and reduce inactivity.

The ErgoFlip, an Australian made and owned company has engineered an innovative office chair that integrates movement by combining a unique 2 seats in 1 chair that includes a conventional seat and with an effortless flip converts to an active surface boasting the health benefits of a fit ball.  The active surface promotes varied postures, increases energy expenditure, strengthens core and back muscles, reduces spinal load and creates blood flow. The ErgoFlip is the first of its kind to offer active sitting with complete ergonomic features with high adjustability (seat height, backrest height, backrest lumbar support, seat surface), to individualise the device for the user.  

Supported with a practical workshop, called Improve Your Stamina for Desk Work, was devised  to inspire a dynamic, healthy workspace and combat sedentary behaviour in learning how to:       

  • correctly set up your workstation      
  • improve posture alignment
  • use ergonomic equipment that promotes movement 
  • take breaks with facilitating movement and exercise

Packaged also with several tutorials on how to sit-active to guide the user on how to maximise the benefits of the chair.

The ErgoFlip comes complete with certifications that comply with Australian standards:

  • Australian Physiotherapy Association Endorsed 
  • TGA Approved 
  • Australian Made and Owned, Manufactured Nationally in NSW, VIC, QLD & WA 
  • 10-year manufacturer’s warranty 
  • Patented and Design Registered

Information supporting the importance of staying active while working at home:
Sedentary workers are feeling the pinch so who is responsible for their wellbeing and safe ergonomics?

According to the World Health Organisation we are now faced with a double pandemic! While of a different nature, the world has been living with another pandemic for a number of years, – physical inactivity (PI) and sedentary behavior (SB). The diseases brought on by inactivity has a whopping price tag for the global economy costing the world $67.bn. Australia shared a huge portion of the cost with the total cost burden of physical inactivity on the Australian economy being $805 million, including $640 million in direct costs and $165 million in productivity losses.

The average Australian spends almost 40 hours per week at work and over 3.7M Australians experience back pain daily, costing $4.8B per year.  Fundamentally, more focus must be put on sedentary behaviour in the workplace. Sitting static at a desk all day leads to conditions related to metabolic syndrome, poor posture, spinal disc compression, decreased flexibility, reduced blood flow, stiff joints and tension, lack of energy and loss of productivity.  

There is overwhelming clinical evidence that supports that the key to combat sedentary work is regular movement and exercise. Whether exercise can help to reduce the impact of prolonged static sitting, the truth is most of us aren’t doing enough exercise.  So we’re being encouraged to try to stand while doing desk work. Don’t try to stand all day, it's not for everyone and can be very tiring but small bouts of movement is important so mixing it up is the key.

This model of 'Disguised fitness' integrated into the workplace, encouraging people to move around more is what some of Australia's biggest companies have adopted including Macquarie Bank, Microsoft and accounting firm KPMG.  These OH&S measures can be monitored and controlled whilst at work but what about when workers are at home? What is in place to encourage regular breaks and movement?

Adopting to the new normal, with COVID-19, people are forced to work remotely. With such transitions still currently in place to “flatten the curve” of coronavirus cases, many are forced to adopt such arrangements for the first time. People are now confined and stuck at their desks and they are more than likely sitting on unsuitable seating like dining room chairs and barstools which is another problem the employer will be faced with.  Poor ergonomics contributes to muscle strain, imbalances and fatigue resulting in a career of neck and back pain. 

Who is responsible for the welfare of the health and safety of 'home workers' to ensure good ergonomics and reduce sedentary behaviour due to lack of inactivity? The model of Work Health & Safety laws still apply at home and employers must provide guidance of what a good workstation set up looks like and how to reduce and avoid sedentary behaviour.  This means employers have the responsibility of looking after the health of their workers at home.

 

ERGOFLIP MADE FOR MOVEMENT

Read more

Pain in the neck, back, shoulders...who pays the price?

Posted by Belinda Cabria on

Introducing the revolutionary functional design in active seating, the ErgoFlip, created as the solution to sitting healthy at your desk to help sedentary workers achieve instantaneous mobility to prevent muscular disorders and reduce inactivity.

The ErgoFlip, an Australian made and owned company has engineered an innovative office chair that integrates movement by combining a unique 2 seats in 1 chair that includes a conventional seat and with an effortless flip converts to an active surface boasting the health benefits of a fit ball.  The active surface promotes varied postures, increases energy expenditure, strengthens core and back muscles, reduces spinal load and creates blood flow. The ErgoFlip is the first of its kind to offer active sitting with complete ergonomic features with high adjustability (seat height, backrest height, backrest lumbar support, seat surface), to individualise the device for the user.  

Supported with a practical workshop, called Improve Your Stamina for Desk Work, was devised  to inspire a dynamic, healthy workspace and combat sedentary behaviour in learning how to:       

  • correctly set up your workstation      
  • improve posture alignment
  • use ergonomic equipment that promotes movement 
  • take breaks with facilitating movement and exercise

Packaged also with several tutorials on how to sit-active to guide the user on how to maximise the benefits of the chair.

The ErgoFlip comes complete with certifications that comply with Australian standards:

  • Australian Physiotherapy Association Endorsed 
  • TGA Approved 
  • Australian Made and Owned, Manufactured Nationally in NSW, VIC, QLD & WA 
  • 10-year manufacturer’s warranty 
  • Patented and Design Registered

Information supporting the importance of staying active while working at home:
Sedentary workers are feeling the pinch so who is responsible for their wellbeing and safe ergonomics?

According to the World Health Organisation we are now faced with a double pandemic! While of a different nature, the world has been living with another pandemic for a number of years, – physical inactivity (PI) and sedentary behavior (SB). The diseases brought on by inactivity has a whopping price tag for the global economy costing the world $67.bn. Australia shared a huge portion of the cost with the total cost burden of physical inactivity on the Australian economy being $805 million, including $640 million in direct costs and $165 million in productivity losses.

The average Australian spends almost 40 hours per week at work and over 3.7M Australians experience back pain daily, costing $4.8B per year.  Fundamentally, more focus must be put on sedentary behaviour in the workplace. Sitting static at a desk all day leads to conditions related to metabolic syndrome, poor posture, spinal disc compression, decreased flexibility, reduced blood flow, stiff joints and tension, lack of energy and loss of productivity.  

There is overwhelming clinical evidence that supports that the key to combat sedentary work is regular movement and exercise. Whether exercise can help to reduce the impact of prolonged static sitting, the truth is most of us aren’t doing enough exercise.  So we’re being encouraged to try to stand while doing desk work. Don’t try to stand all day, it's not for everyone and can be very tiring but small bouts of movement is important so mixing it up is the key.

This model of 'Disguised fitness' integrated into the workplace, encouraging people to move around more is what some of Australia's biggest companies have adopted including Macquarie Bank, Microsoft and accounting firm KPMG.  These OH&S measures can be monitored and controlled whilst at work but what about when workers are at home? What is in place to encourage regular breaks and movement?

Adopting to the new normal, with COVID-19, people are forced to work remotely. With such transitions still currently in place to “flatten the curve” of coronavirus cases, many are forced to adopt such arrangements for the first time. People are now confined and stuck at their desks and they are more than likely sitting on unsuitable seating like dining room chairs and barstools which is another problem the employer will be faced with.  Poor ergonomics contributes to muscle strain, imbalances and fatigue resulting in a career of neck and back pain. 

Who is responsible for the welfare of the health and safety of 'home workers' to ensure good ergonomics and reduce sedentary behaviour due to lack of inactivity? The model of Work Health & Safety laws still apply at home and employers must provide guidance of what a good workstation set up looks like and how to reduce and avoid sedentary behaviour.  This means employers have the responsibility of looking after the health of their workers at home.

 

ERGOFLIP MADE FOR MOVEMENT

Read more


The Health Benefits of Movement

Posted by ergoflip Admin on

The health benefits of standing are highly debated. What science says about the Standing Desk?

Sitting still is killing our bodies and it's obvious that our bodies are not designed to sit still. What does the research say about sitting? Are standing desks really the best option for your health and productivity?

So, What's bad about sitting?

The fundamental principle is that a sedentary lifestyle and the physiologic changes that ensue are harmful to us. There’s a lot of evidence that physical inactivity is linked to higher morbidity and mortality, but the question is how does this relate to sitting at our desks, and whether standing desks are a viable alternative?

Mandsager and colleagues demonstrated in 2018 that poor cardiorespiratory fitness, as assessed on an exercise treadmill test, was strongly correlated with mortality. In short, if we're in better shape, we’re less likely to die.

It is important to note, however, that this study, and many others, are retrospective studies and therefore by definition, they demonstrate correlation, not causation. Additionally, it’s been noted that the negative effects of sitting aren’t reversed by exercise. Reason being, the metabolic changes and subsequent deleterious effects induced by sitting aren’t simply reversed by being active. Sitting also increases the pressure to your lower back in comparison to standing. Ever notice that your back hurts more when you sit for prolonged periods of time?

Let's talk about the evidence of the Standing Desk

If sitting for prolonged periods is bad for us, it’s easy to see how standing desks or stand up desk would seem like a logical solution. In 2013, Buckley and colleagues demonstrated that standing reduces postprandial glycemic variability, meaning your blood sugar varies less after eating a meal if you’re standing. This is good, as greater amplitudes of glycemic variability have been linked to circulatory oxidative stress. However, Bailey and Locke also in 2013 had conflicting data, suggesting that standing did not alter postprandial glycemic variation, but short bouts of light-intensity activity did.

In 2017, Gibbs and colleagues postulated that decreased caloric expenditure could be a specific mechanism through which sedentary behavior increases health risks, such as by contributing to an energy imbalance leading to obesity. They also demonstrate that standing expends more energy than sitting - no surprise there! As a whole however, the literature regarding the benefits of standing desk is not clear cut. Katzarzyk in 2013 suggested that increased standing time was correlated to reduced mortality rates, but Smith and colleagues in 2017 suggested the exact opposite; that occupations involving primarily standing were associated with a 2-fold increase in heart disease compared to occupations involving predominantly sitting. Several other studies I came across in my research emphasized the increases in physical activity associated with standing desks, reduction of lower back pain, and improvement in cholesterol or blood pressure.

The overwhelming majority of the studies were retrospective and did not adequately control for possible confounding variables. For example, Smith and colleagues demonstrated that people working occupations involving primarily standing was associated with a 2-fold increase in heart disease. But without controlling for the types of occupations, socioeconomic variables, and other demographic factors, that information is close to meaningless. But the message is very clear that sedentary lifestyle is not good for you. 
 

However, others suggested that without realising, the increased physical activity at a standing desk was offset by a decrease in physical activity away from the desk. Moreover, a recent study conducted at Curtin University in Australia where 20 people were observed during two hours of laboratory-based standing computer work shows that after 75 minutes of standing-up, there is an increase of discomfort and cognitive function, along with muscle fatigue, movement, lower limb swelling and mental state. Although "creative' decision-making was shown to marginally improve. Standup desk associated with deterioration in reaction time and mental state.

Professor Alan Taylor, a physiotherapy expert at Nottingham University, said: “The bottom line is that this expansion has been driven more by commercial reasons than scientific evidence.

 

So, what can we do?

Standup desk is a result of people expecting an easy fix for sedentary lifestyle but unfortunately, even with the scientific method we don’t get clear cut answers, and we must make decisions with imperfect informationHowever, the data is quite strong that a sedentary lifestyle is not good for you and standing desk is not the only solution for sedentary lifestyle. Ultimately, too much standing or sitting would result in discomfort and no matter how much you exercise you cannot reduce the negative effects of prolonged sitting.

Caldwell and colleagues in 2018 even demonstrated that prolonged standing resulted in measurable increases in arterial stiffness. It seems, then, that any form of inactivity, whether standing or seated, results in negative health implications. Instead of focusing on standing or sitting at our desks, it appears that the most important principle is to move regularly

Based on 4 years of development and the overwhelming support of clinical evidence movement is the answer to reducing muscular disorders from prolonged sitting. small bouts of movement are the key and ErgoFlip created to move you while sitting. 

Standing is not the only solution! ErgoFlip is the missing link to create movement while sitting at your desk.

Sit in Motion & Stay Active!

 

References

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00140139.2017.1420825

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2018/02/23/standing-desks-increase-pain-slow-mental-ability-new-study/ 

https://news.curtin.edu.au/media-releases/sedentary-jobs-an-occupational-hazard-for-many-industries/

Special Credits to Dr Kevin Jubbal, MedSchoolInsiders.com for the amazing video and research

Read more

The Health Benefits of Movement

Posted by ergoflip Admin on

The health benefits of standing are highly debated. What science says about the Standing Desk?

Sitting still is killing our bodies and it's obvious that our bodies are not designed to sit still. What does the research say about sitting? Are standing desks really the best option for your health and productivity?

So, What's bad about sitting?

The fundamental principle is that a sedentary lifestyle and the physiologic changes that ensue are harmful to us. There’s a lot of evidence that physical inactivity is linked to higher morbidity and mortality, but the question is how does this relate to sitting at our desks, and whether standing desks are a viable alternative?

Mandsager and colleagues demonstrated in 2018 that poor cardiorespiratory fitness, as assessed on an exercise treadmill test, was strongly correlated with mortality. In short, if we're in better shape, we’re less likely to die.

It is important to note, however, that this study, and many others, are retrospective studies and therefore by definition, they demonstrate correlation, not causation. Additionally, it’s been noted that the negative effects of sitting aren’t reversed by exercise. Reason being, the metabolic changes and subsequent deleterious effects induced by sitting aren’t simply reversed by being active. Sitting also increases the pressure to your lower back in comparison to standing. Ever notice that your back hurts more when you sit for prolonged periods of time?

Let's talk about the evidence of the Standing Desk

If sitting for prolonged periods is bad for us, it’s easy to see how standing desks or stand up desk would seem like a logical solution. In 2013, Buckley and colleagues demonstrated that standing reduces postprandial glycemic variability, meaning your blood sugar varies less after eating a meal if you’re standing. This is good, as greater amplitudes of glycemic variability have been linked to circulatory oxidative stress. However, Bailey and Locke also in 2013 had conflicting data, suggesting that standing did not alter postprandial glycemic variation, but short bouts of light-intensity activity did.

In 2017, Gibbs and colleagues postulated that decreased caloric expenditure could be a specific mechanism through which sedentary behavior increases health risks, such as by contributing to an energy imbalance leading to obesity. They also demonstrate that standing expends more energy than sitting - no surprise there! As a whole however, the literature regarding the benefits of standing desk is not clear cut. Katzarzyk in 2013 suggested that increased standing time was correlated to reduced mortality rates, but Smith and colleagues in 2017 suggested the exact opposite; that occupations involving primarily standing were associated with a 2-fold increase in heart disease compared to occupations involving predominantly sitting. Several other studies I came across in my research emphasized the increases in physical activity associated with standing desks, reduction of lower back pain, and improvement in cholesterol or blood pressure.

The overwhelming majority of the studies were retrospective and did not adequately control for possible confounding variables. For example, Smith and colleagues demonstrated that people working occupations involving primarily standing was associated with a 2-fold increase in heart disease. But without controlling for the types of occupations, socioeconomic variables, and other demographic factors, that information is close to meaningless. But the message is very clear that sedentary lifestyle is not good for you. 
 

However, others suggested that without realising, the increased physical activity at a standing desk was offset by a decrease in physical activity away from the desk. Moreover, a recent study conducted at Curtin University in Australia where 20 people were observed during two hours of laboratory-based standing computer work shows that after 75 minutes of standing-up, there is an increase of discomfort and cognitive function, along with muscle fatigue, movement, lower limb swelling and mental state. Although "creative' decision-making was shown to marginally improve. Standup desk associated with deterioration in reaction time and mental state.

Professor Alan Taylor, a physiotherapy expert at Nottingham University, said: “The bottom line is that this expansion has been driven more by commercial reasons than scientific evidence.

 

So, what can we do?

Standup desk is a result of people expecting an easy fix for sedentary lifestyle but unfortunately, even with the scientific method we don’t get clear cut answers, and we must make decisions with imperfect informationHowever, the data is quite strong that a sedentary lifestyle is not good for you and standing desk is not the only solution for sedentary lifestyle. Ultimately, too much standing or sitting would result in discomfort and no matter how much you exercise you cannot reduce the negative effects of prolonged sitting.

Caldwell and colleagues in 2018 even demonstrated that prolonged standing resulted in measurable increases in arterial stiffness. It seems, then, that any form of inactivity, whether standing or seated, results in negative health implications. Instead of focusing on standing or sitting at our desks, it appears that the most important principle is to move regularly

Based on 4 years of development and the overwhelming support of clinical evidence movement is the answer to reducing muscular disorders from prolonged sitting. small bouts of movement are the key and ErgoFlip created to move you while sitting. 

Standing is not the only solution! ErgoFlip is the missing link to create movement while sitting at your desk.

Sit in Motion & Stay Active!

 

References

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00140139.2017.1420825

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2018/02/23/standing-desks-increase-pain-slow-mental-ability-new-study/ 

https://news.curtin.edu.au/media-releases/sedentary-jobs-an-occupational-hazard-for-many-industries/

Special Credits to Dr Kevin Jubbal, MedSchoolInsiders.com for the amazing video and research

Read more


Many Ways to Train Core Muscle with ErgoFlip Dynamic Active Stool

Posted by ergoflip Admin on

Strong core muscles are important as weak core muscles can lead to more fatigue, less endurance and injuries. Weak core muscles can also leave you susceptible to poor posture, lower back pain and muscle injuries. Strengthening core muscles may also help to reduce back pain. Total body core care with the ErgoFlip!

Read more

Many Ways to Train Core Muscle with ErgoFlip Dynamic Active Stool

Posted by ergoflip Admin on

Strong core muscles are important as weak core muscles can lead to more fatigue, less endurance and injuries. Weak core muscles can also leave you susceptible to poor posture, lower back pain and muscle injuries. Strengthening core muscles may also help to reduce back pain. Total body core care with the ErgoFlip!

Read more


Take Active Sitting To Your Desk

Posted by ergoflip Admin on

You may choose just to sit and allow the ErgoFlip to move you naturally as a micro break or integrate some gentle exercises as shown to create movement around the lumbar-pelvic region. (For more exercise tips refer to our Sit-Active Program)

Read more

Take Active Sitting To Your Desk

Posted by ergoflip Admin on

You may choose just to sit and allow the ErgoFlip to move you naturally as a micro break or integrate some gentle exercises as shown to create movement around the lumbar-pelvic region. (For more exercise tips refer to our Sit-Active Program)

Read more


A Chair You Can Flip

Posted by ergoflip Admin on

ErgoFlip Review by David Hall National Chair of APA Occ. Health Physio. Assoc and Director of PHW Group

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A Chair You Can Flip

Posted by ergoflip Admin on